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POTATOES: THE HUNGER BUSTING HERO!

October is World Hunger Action Month when public awareness is raised around this important issue. World Food Day is celebrated on the 16th of October with the focus to increase the understanding of practical solutions in the drive to end hunger globally. When aiming to eradicate barriers to this basic human right, it is important that staple foods become the heroes and that they are prepared in nutritious, cost-effective and delicious ways.

Potatoes are one of South Africa’s staple foods. Potatoes can be enjoyed in a variety of different ways and provide key vitamins, minerals and beneficial nutrients to the diet. The preparation of potatoes is critical when including the later as a regular food source in the diet. If prepared as a South African favourite “slap chips” potatoes can be the carrier for excess oils (thereby contributing to high energy intakes) and salts in the diet which have an adverse effect on health when consumed in large quantities. These effects increase the risk of chronic diseases of lifestyle such as Heart Disease, Diabetes and Hypertension.

Similarly, if potatoes are peeled and soaked before cooking, a large proportion of the water soluble vitamins – particularly vitamin C – can be lost in the process. The vitamins leak out into the water and are no longer available when eating the potatoes. The skin of the potato contains nutrients but also a significant amount of fibre. By peeling potatoes one loses this beneficial addition of nutrients and fibre to the diet. Furthermore peeling potatoes also diminishes the bulk or volume added to the meal, this directly impacts the feeling of fullness as the more volume a meal contains the more filling it is. This happens via the vagal nerve which senses the fullness of the stomach and sends a message to the brain to decrease appetite. Because of this, the bulk content of the meal is an important quality to reduce hunger and increase satisfaction and should not be lost due to incorrect preparation techniques.

Focus on the key points below to make sure your spuds are in good hands and your tummy is well taken care of this World Hunger month:

Keep the skin on: By eating your potatoes with skin, the fibre content of the meal is increased. This adds greater bulk and satiety to the meal to increase the feeling of fullness. The skin also contains a portion of the vitamins found in Potatoes - vitamin C and vitamin B6 – so it is important that the skin is scrubbed clean but kept intact.

Cook smart: Bake, boil, steam, mash and roast potatoes before eating them. Enjoy the wide variety of textures and flavours that potatoes can provide without needing to add excess oil which contributes unnecessary energy.

Stop soaking: Scrub and wash the potato skin clean to avoid any dirt from being added to the meal. Rinse the potatoes gently and cook them immediately. Soaking will reduce the vitamin content of the spuds and decrease their overall nutritional benefit to the meal.

Eat the Colour of the Rainbow: Use other vegetables to further increase the bulk of the meal. This will improve satisfaction as well as nutrient content and will ensure fulfilment and optimal health from the diet. Vegetables are also cost-effective and this will increase the amount of food available for the family to enjoy. Look out for specials when buying vegetables. Many South African retailers offer discounts for vegetables bought in bulk, which can be shared with family members or neighbours to prevent wastage.


Umfino – Traditional Cabbage & Onion Dish

  • Serves 6 as a side dish
  • 2 Medium Onions
  • 2 Bunches of Spinach Leaves
  • 1 Large Cabbage
  • 18 Baby Potatoes

Dice the onion and chop equal amounts of spinach and cabbage. Add 2 tsp. canola oil to a pan. Add the onion and cook until translucent and soft. Add the spinach and the cabbage to the pan, together with the baby potatoes, diced into quarters. Put the lid on the pan and cook for 15-20 minutes until soft, but not soggy.

Nutritional Information per serving: 580 kJ Energy, 5.1 g Protein, 0.4 g Fat, 22.3 g Carbohydrates, 6.0 g Fibre, 634.3 mg Sodium


Rustic Smashed Potatoes

  • Serves 6 as a side dish
  • 3 large Potatoes
  • ½ cup Low Fat Milk or Buttermilk
  • Handful of Fresh Rosemary or 2 tsp. Dried Rosemary

Put the whole unpeeled potatoes in a large pot and add enough water to cover. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer until the potatoes are tender when pierced (25 to 30 minutes). Cut the potatoes into chunks and add fresh chopped rosemary or dried rosemary together with ½ cup buttermilk or Low Fat Milk. Using a potato masher, mash until mostly smooth and sprinkle with seasoning. Pinch of salt and black pepper.

Nutritional Information per serving: 336.8 kJ Energy, 2.0 g Protein, 0.5 g Fat, 15.3 g Carbohydrates, 1.4 g Fibre, 335.2 mg Sodium

BUST HUNGER CHALLENGE 2015

Tonight, twelve million South Africans will go to bed hungry. Twelve million of our fellow South Africans do not have access to affordable food which will provide them with the daily required nutrient intake. More South Africans die as a result of hunger, than AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis collectively. Potatoes South Africa finds these statistic shocking and is doing its bit to remedy this saddening pandemic. The Bust Huger Challenge, hosted by Potatoes SA, kicks off on Thursday, 28 May, 2015 to run throughout the South African winter when nourishment is needed most.

POTATOES CARRY THE POTENTIAL TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE…

Media Release
25 May 2015

According to the World Food Bank, there are 11 million South Africans who are living in cases of extreme poverty and as a result, go to bed hungry every single day. Further reports reveal that hunger kills more people than AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis combined. In South Africa where the triple threat issues of poverty, unemployment and inequality continue to tarnish the dignity of many people’s lives, the observance of World Hunger Day is of paramount importance. “No one South African should go to bed hungry. For as long as there are people who on a daily basis are burdened with the concern of their where next meal is going to come from, how can we claim to be truly liberated?” asks Ms. Immaculate Zinde, Manager: Product Promotions, Potatoes South Africa (PSA).

The potato industry is alarmed by these statistics and has pledged to show their support for the hungry and poor of South Africa by way of donating R10 000 to the Africa Children Feeding Scheme in Alexander, Johannesburg. In the true spirit of making a difference and as so eloquently captured in the phrase: “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day; show him how to catch fish, and you feed him for a lifetime”, on 28 May 2015, Potatoes South Africa will in addition to donating money but partner with Anna Montali, South Africa’s leading foodie, journalist, recipe developer and food stylists who will demonstrate at the feeding scheme the value of incorporating potatoes into a balanced, nutrient dense, and wholesome meal. Claire Julsing Strydom, who is registered with the HPCSA and the American Nutrition and Dietetic Academy and is the current President for the Association for Dietetics in South Africa, has volunteered her time to educate, inform and impart nutritional information that is critical in curbing food insecurity.

“The value of the potato is not only disregarded but highly underestimated. Potatoes remain one of the most affordable and accessible vegetables and starch on the South African market. This is in line with two of the Food Based Dietary Guidelines of South Africa as prescribed by the Department of Health which state that South Africans should:

  • “Make starchy foods part of most meals”: a food-based dietary guideline for South Africa
  • “Eat plenty of vegetables and fruit every day”: a food-based dietary guideline for South Africa

“When prepared in a healthy manner, potatoes provide individuals with nutrients while keeping them fuller for longer”, says Immaculate Zinde. Not only are potatoes nutritious, affordable, and socially acceptable, potatoes are already an integral part of the global food system. They are the world’s number one non-grain food commodity with the primary potato industry in South Africa contributing a substantial R3.6 billion to the South African economy.

“While we are mindful of the fact that there are still misconceptions around potato consumption as it relates to nutrition and health, our research shows that the average annual compounded growth rate in the per capita consumption of potatoes in South Africa is between 2% and 3%. Bottom line - potatoes are still a very important part of the South African shopping basket.” Says Potatoes South Africa CEO, Dr. André Jooste.

Within the horticulture sector, potatoes contribute 13% of the gross value, making them the third biggest in the sector after deciduous and tropical fruits, while it boasts as the fifth biggest product in the agricultural sector - excluding livestock. “To that end, the primary industry employs between 60 000 and 80 000 casual and permanent jobs annually. Thereby affording people the opportunity to earn a living, which in essence provides the opportunity to feed their families” Continues Dr. Jooste

To many South Africans, a potato is a vegetable and starch food on a plate. To just over 640 of South African potato farmers and farm workers, it is a vital source of income. For many nutritionists it is a product that must form part and parcel of a nutrient-dense and balanced diet. For PSA employees it is a food crop that can address the triple threat issues of poverty, unemployment and inequality.

PSA is also initiating the Hunger Bust Campaign (#HBC) in observance of World Hunger Day. The #HBC challenges South African retail, fresh produce markets, processing companies and any interested organisation to match or better PSA’s donation by pledging monetary and other support to a charity organisation of its choice. The campaign will be launched on 28 May and end on World Food Day, 16 October 2015.

For further information on the Hunger Buster campaign, please contact Jean at Storybook Communications at 021 975 3553, or alternatively, jean@storybookcommunications.co.za.

BUST HUNGER CHALLENGE AMBASSADORS…

Anna Montali

According to the World Food Bank, there are 11 million South Africans who are living in cases of extreme poverty and as a result, go to bed hungry every single day. Further reports reveal that hunger kills more people than AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis combined. In South Africa where the triple threat issues of poverty, unemployment and inequality continue to tarnish the dignity of many people’s lives, the observance of World Hunger Day is of paramount importance. “No one South African should go to bed hungry. For as long as there are people who on a daily basis are burdened with the concern of their where next meal is going to come from, how can we claim to be truly liberated?” asks Ms. Immaculate Zinde, Manager: Product Promotions, Potatoes South Africa (PSA).

Claire Julsing Strydom

Claire Julsing Strydom, RD (SA) works as a private practicing dietitian with her partners at Nutritional Solutions. She completed her Master of Science degree in Dietetics through the University of the Free State. Claire has extensive experience in corporate wellness and has presented nutrition intervention programs/presentations for various organisations and consults to the food and pharmaceutical industries. She has written for numerous publications and regularly contributes to health related television and radio shows. Claire has provided nutrition education initiatives for schools including the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy. She presents educational lecturing to health professionals and hosts an annual nutrition education workshop for dietitians. She is registered with the HPCSA and the American Nutrition and Dietetic Academy and is the current President for the Association for Dietetics in South Africa.

Immaculate Zinde

Immaculate Zinde is a BComm (Hons) graduate and currently doing her final year of Master of Business Leadership (MBL) with the University of South Africa School of Business Leadership. She has been with Potatoes South Africa for nine years and heads up the potato promotions of Potatoes South Africa. Immaculate is passionate about everything marketing, potatoes, and life. Her favourite quote which guides and inspires everything she does is: “Every memorable act in the history of the world is a triumph of enthusiasm. Nothing great was ever achieved without it because it gives any challenge or any occupation, no matter how frightening or difficult, a new meaning. Without enthusiasm you are doomed to a life of mediocrity but with it you can accomplish miracles.” Og Mandino

INTERNATIONAL POTATO GROUP

The International Potato Group (IPG) is the outcome of the British Potato Council, now known as the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Group (AHDG) and Potatoes South Africa's chairpersons who initiated the idea of the formation of a non-competititve potato group that seeks to work together to share skills, knowledge and resources for the benefit of the group and respective countries participating in the group.

Please click on the link below to download or read the document.

Claire Julsing Strydom

Claire Julsing Strydom, RD (SA) works as a private practicing dietitian with her partners at Nutritional Solutions. She completed her Master of Science degree in Dietetics through the University of the Free State. Claire has extensive experience in corporate wellness and has presented nutrition intervention programs/presentations for various organisations and consults to the food and pharmaceutical industries. She has written for numerous publications and regularly contributes to health related television and radio shows. Claire has provided nutrition education initiatives for schools including the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy. She presents educational lecturing to health professionals and hosts an annual nutrition education workshop for dietitians. She is registered with the HPCSA and the American Nutrition and Dietetic Academy and is the current President for the Association for Dietetics in South Africa.

Immaculate Zinde

Immaculate Zinde is a BComm (Hons) graduate and currently doing her final year of Master of Business Leadership (MBL) with the University of South Africa School of Business Leadership. She has been with Potatoes South Africa for nine years and heads up the potato promotions of Potatoes South Africa. Immaculate is passionate about everything marketing, potatoes, and life. Her favourite quote which guides and inspires everything she does is: “Every memorable act in the history of the world is a triumph of enthusiasm. Nothing great was ever achieved without it because it gives any challenge or any occupation, no matter how frightening or difficult, a new meaning. Without enthusiasm you are doomed to a life of mediocrity but with it you can accomplish miracles.” Og Mandino